spacer.png, 0 kB

These wonderful puppies come from the Golden Retriever kennels at Gut Wertheim.

Click for more flickr images.

 

spacer.png, 0 kB
spacer.png, 0 kB
Home
The Impact of BI on Business Processes
Written by Paul Lewin   
Saturday, 11 August 2007

When companies start to look a BI it is mostly seen as something that doesn't really fit in or apply to the business process in any way. In fact quite the contrary is true. There is a great potential in the near future for Business Intelligence to radically affect the business process. In my opinion BI is still viewed by most companies as expensive and ineffective. Which is probable true at the moment, there being too few BI-Business Solutions around and too few experience people to design and build the required custom solutions.

But what I really feel is that BI shouldn’t be view as it currently is as something “technical”. OK so you have to have a platform and that should meet a list of requirements. But when a company starts to invest in BI they need to be aware that what they are really talking about is evolving their processes to a new state-of-the-art push-driven architecture.

Most decision processes are based on collecting and filtering information in order to be able to discuss the implications and the resulting consequences which need to be addressed. This form of decision making is time consuming and on a timeline basis too slow.

Working in a pre-emptive BI world it would be far more sensible to have your BI system connected to your Business Process Management system and have business rules in place which will allow the right people to make qualified decisions as early as possible. But weather you have a BPM or not, once you start talking about BI you should also be looking at the “decision making” processes.

 
Making the right decisions
Written by Paul Lewin   
Wednesday, 14 March 2007

When it comes to putting a BI system into place, it is often forgotten that it's not just a technical question being addressed. In fact in my opinion the technical BI foundation or plattform is almost irrelevant. The question which must be asked is not just who is going to profit by installing a BI system but how is it going to impact the decision makers and their processes?

Most management decisions today are gut-feeling decisions. That is one takes into account all of the available information (data and marketing forecasts) and you then make a good guess balanced with the knowledge that the data is not rely reliable as indeed are the forecasts. The decisions are well balanced by intuition and experience - which is good if you have a wealth of that. It is, however, not easy for others to gauge and understand and it is not easy to document and therefore monitor. If you make a decision it should be possible to evaluate if that decision is having the desired effect – thus was it “good” or “bad”.

The challenge to business and BI alike is to design and build BI systems which have very reliable information and will allow the decision makers to track changes in results after decision changes have been put into place. It is also desirable to document the rules being applied to the decision process. While decision rules are always affected by change, it can been very helpful to have the rules documented so that the impact of change can be reviewed against the rule base.

Last Updated ( Wednesday, 14 March 2007 )
 
OSS - Just a phase?
Written by Paul Lewin   
Thursday, 22 February 2007

Open Source is making a difference in most of the IT industry - but why? This article by Tim O'Reilly takes a look at some of those reasons. Most of what he assumes I would also agree with, but his initial references to truths are correctly criticised in one of the subsequent comments.

As for the prediction as to how long OSS will be with us, if we have see anything over the past 3 decades of IT, it is that things move even faster and our focus continually moves higher up the technology stack. By that I mean we concentrate our efforts less and less on the underlying technology and focus ever more on the business cases. IT solutions will inevitably become insignificant from a business point-of-view. They will be required and expected to perform as a platform - but strategically be insignificant. The simple modelling of business-cases and their intuitive orchestration within the overall business process context will move more and more into the focus of end-customers.

Last Updated ( Thursday, 22 February 2007 )
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 Next > End >>

Results 1 - 4 of 5
spacer.png, 0 kB
spacer.png, 0 kB
spacer.png, 0 kB
spacer.png, 0 kB